Tag Archives: vintage

The Glad Hatter

24 Sep

Ask any of my relatives what food item I resembled as a baby, and you’re likely to get this common answer: a siopao. I owe this largely to my complexion and round, bald head.

This baldness at birth is a staple in my father’s lineage – an heirloom propensity where even the girls are not exempt.

My mother happily took to dressing me in dresses and hats, perhaps in an effort to make me look less of a baby boy.

Me on my first birthday

This tradition continued until I was about two, when my head was shaved for the last time.

Angel at age 2

Angel at age 2

When the hems of my dresses grew longer, my hair too grew out as I outgrew my hats. 

But my affinity for them couldn’t be capped so easily, and this outfit pays homage to that fondness.

Sometimes I come across pictures from the 1930’s and older, and muse over how sharply people used to dress. Besides providing protection from the elements, hats indicated social status and functioned as confidence boosters. 

Today, one would be hard-pressed to find occasions to wear hats, especially in a tropical country like the Philippines. But I subscribe to the notion that non-occasions can be occasions in themselves — hence my sporting a hat and a dress to school one Tuesday in August. 

For an even more vintage feel, my wuvly photographer and I headed to the art deco-inspired Aldaba Hall for this shoot.

The printed yellow dress is a P35 ukay find from Ayala. My gray hat (P269) is from Landmark, worn with shoes by Comfit and a quaint mustache ring. 

The Mean Reds and Friends as Tiffany’s

9 Aug

Growing up, I had my fair share of advice from adults and self-help books to be judicious in finding company. “Be careful choosing your friends,” a particular book said, “you become who they are.”

With time I came to realize that friendship, as with any relationship worth its while, becomes less about enabling circumstances and more about the choices we make to stay connected. This becomes especially true when circumstances – for reasons geographical, professional, spatial, or if you want to go all Bradbury or Spielberg about it, dimensional – make togetherness anywhere from a notch to an eon more difficult. Ultimately, the desire to connect — or re-connect — is a commitment.

Nineteen years ago, I was born on the last week of July in the midst of a thunderstorm. Every birthday since, it had been a challenge to invite people to celebrate with. Varying degrees of rain were constant gatecrashers at my parties, after all. But this July 29 was a different story, with some of those I hold dearest conspiring for a surprise get-together.

The tapestries of each friendship are as diverse as the people themselves, but a single thread binds them together. They are among the first people I could, would and do turn to when I get a bad case of what Audrey Hepburn (as Holly Golightly) called the “mean reds”.

My birthday outfit was inspired by the iconic “wild thing” Miss Golightly.

The Taylor black brocade dress (P250) is from Red Tomato. Black leather platforms are by Gibi. Layered teardrops choker (P150) is a tiangge find, and the necklace used as a hair accessory is a birthday gift.

Here’s one of my favorite scenes from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, where Holly explains the mean reds to her writer-neighbor Paul Varjak:

Holly: Poor cat! Poor slob! Poor slob without a name! The way I see it I haven’t got the right to give him one. We don’t belong to each other. We just took up one day by the river. I don’t want to own anything until I find a place where me and things go together. I’m not sure where that is but I know what it is like. It’s like Tiffany’s. 

Paul: Tiffany’s? You mean the jewelry store. 

Holly: That’s right. I’m just CRAZY about Tiffany’s! Listen, you know those days when you get the mean reds? 

Paul: The mean reds, you mean like the blues? 

Holly: No. The blues are because you’re getting fat and maybe it’s been raining too long, you’re just sad that’s all. The mean reds are horrible. Suddenly you’re afraid and you don’t know what you’re afraid of. Do you ever get that feeling? 

Paul: Sure. 

Holly: Well, when I get it the only thing that does any good is to jump in a cab and go to Tiffany’s. Calms me down right away. The quietness and the proud look of it; nothing very bad could happen to you there. If I could find a real-life place that’d make me feel like Tiffany’s, then – then I’d buy some furniture and give the cat a name! 

In another scene, Holly said, “Anyone who ever gave you confidence, you owe them a lot.” I may not see these lovelies all the time, but everyday I’m grateful for the likes of them, who make me feel like Tiffany’s — and eons, eons better.

via Tumblr http://bargainmuse.tumblr.com/post/29045759294

9 Aug

The Mean Reds and Friends as Tiffany’s

Growing up, I had my fair share of advice from adults and self-help books to be judicious in finding company. “Be careful choosing your friends,” a particular book said, “you become who they are.” 

With time I came to realize that friendship, as with any relationship worth its while, becomes less about enabling circumstances and more about the choices we make to stay connected. This becomes especially true when circumstances – for reasons geographical, professional, spatial, or if you want to go all Bradbury or Spielberg about it, dimensional – make togetherness anywhere from a notch to an eon more difficult.

The desire to connect is a commitment.

Nineteen years ago, I was born on the last week of July in the midst of a thunderstorm. Every birthday since, it had been a challenge to invite people to celebrate with. Varying degrees of rain were constant gatecrashers at my parties, after all. But this July 29 was a different story, with some of those I hold dearest conspiring for a surprise get-together. 

The tapestries of each friendship are as diverse as the people themselves, but a single thread binds them together. They are among the first people I could, would and do turn to when I get a bad case of what Audrey Hepburn (as Holly Golightly) called the “mean reds”.

My birthday outfit was inspired by the iconic “wild thing” Miss Golightly.

The Taylor black brocade dress (P250) is from Red Tomato. Black leather platforms are by Gibi. Layered teardrops choker (P150) is a tiangge find, and the necklace used as a hair accessory is a birthday gift.

Here’s one of my favorite scenes from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, where Holly explains the mean reds to her writer-neighbor Paul Varjak: 

Holly: Poor cat! Poor slob! Poor slob without a name! The way I see it I haven’t got the right to give him one. We don’t belong to each other. We just took up one day by the river. I don’t want to own anything until I find a place where me and things go together. I’m not sure where that is but I know what it is like. It’s like Tiffany’s. 

Paul: Tiffany’s? You mean the jewelry store. 

Holly: That’s right. I’m just CRAZY about Tiffany’s! Listen, you know those days when you get the mean reds? 

Paul: The mean reds, you mean like the blues? 

Holly: No. The blues are because you’re getting fat and maybe it’s been raining too long, you’re just sad that’s all. The mean reds are horrible. Suddenly you’re afraid and you don’t know what you’re afraid of. Do you ever get that feeling? 

Paul: Sure. 

Holly: Well, when I get it the only thing that does any good is to jump in a cab and go to Tiffany’s. Calms me down right away. The quietness and the proud look of it; nothing very bad could happen to you there. If I could find a real-life place that’d make me feel like Tiffany’s, then – then I’d buy some furniture and give the cat a name! 

In another scene, Holly said, “Anyone who ever gave you confidence, you owe them a lot.” I may not see these lovelies all the time, but everyday I’m grateful for the likes of them, who make me feel like Tiffany’s — and eons, eons better.

30 Jul

Designed by Guel Karaan for UPJC

Prof. Mikee Inton at the UPJC IF

Org buddy Flo and I doing a Charmee ad

With Alex, my baby shark Ate >:)

Because vintage

Because still vintage

Out and About

Among the most unique facets of studying in a liberal institution is the diversity of learning experiences inside and outside the classroom. It’s only in UP, for example, where one would find courses like Queer Theory, Philosophy of Love and Sex and LGBT Psychology.

I took the latter subject in 2010 under Prof. Eric Manalastas. One lesson I will never forget is his comparison of the LGBT community to other minorities, particularly those based on race and economic status.

The key difference, he said, was that if someone were African-American or poor, at least one of their parents would belong to the same minority group. The same can very rarely be said for LGBTs – even within one’s own family, support systems can be hard to come by.

As a minority, and especially in the context of a dominantly Catholic country like thePhilippines, there is propensity for the LGBT movement to be sensationalized, misrepresented, or worst, underrepresented in the media.

Last July 26, the UP Journalism Club launched the Issue Forum (IF), a series of monthly dialogues anchored on the most pressing issues in Philippine media and society. This July’s IF delved on the current dynamics between the LGBT community and media. Talk points included media coverage and treatment of LGBT-related stories, LGBT media practitioners and the media consumption habits of LGBT individuals.

The University Student Council’s Vice Chairperson Alex Castro, Reverend Ceejay Agbayani of the Metropolitan Community Church-Q.C., Prof. Mikee Inton of theCollegeofMass Communication, and TV5’s Research Head Danton Remoto facilitated the discussion.

After the forum, we JCers feasted on palabok, pichi-pichi, communal Coke and Chupa Chups for my pre-birthday treat.

Today’s look was inspired by the white trapo (cloth rag) used by drivers to clean up their taxis, jeepneys and what-have-you.

Of course I kid. But admit it, the resemblance is uncanny. Haha!

I couldn’t resist playing around with filters for a few vintage-esque shots (last photos in the set), because the hie-thee-hither hem of the dress reminds me of playful swimsuits from the 1950s.

This ruffled, floral and flitty little number cost P130 from a thrift store in Buendia. The gold ribbon is recycled from last year’s birthday gift, and the gold ribboned shoes are from Landmark.

Photo credits to Jodesz Gavilan, whose prodding and encouragement propelled this blog’s creation.

26 Jul

Every girl weaned on pop culture must have grown up having a favorite Disney princess. Mine was Snow White. I even had a Snow White-themed seventh birthday party, complete with costume and boy friends who doubled as well-wishing seven dwarves.

My reason for liking her was simple. As a child, I felt that pale Snow White with her apple cut (heh) bob and high propensity for breaking into song was the most relatable in a gaggle of long-haired, mostly Caucasian girl royals. Besides, I had (and still have) a relatively bigger shoe size than most girls, and was horrified to realize that my feet resembled the evil stepsisters’ more than it did Cinderella’s.

Last Tuesday’s outfit took inspiration from my favorite apple-munching princess. The top is from Samlin, the skirt an ukay find from Philcoa (P35), and the shoes from Grendha. The whole look is topped with a ribbon recycled from a birthday package I received last year.

Photos credits to the owzum Raine Calucag.